WaterOnMars now runs on Bootstrap3

wom-logo-128When I started developing WaterOnMars, the fashionable toolkit for web GUI work was the version 2 of Twitter Bootstrap. Of course, by the time my project reached a truly usable state, the version 3 of bootstrap was released and the version 2 stopped being maintained. Another example of the perpetual obsolescence developers have had to face since the dawn of time (e.g the 70’s).

Version 3’s major feature being its first class support for mobile platform and my main usage of WaterOnMars being via a tablet, migrating was really tempting but I had no idea how much work I’d have to put into it.

I did it a few weeks a go though and the good news was that it’s been much much easier that I thought.

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fabric: a good assistant for the development of WaterOnMars

wom-logo-128Despite spending currently more time using my WaterOnMars feed reader than developing it, I’m still making small improvements to it. And to make my life easier I could count on a solid little project: fabric !

fabric is a Python based command-line utility designed to help running commands remotely: typically to deploy a web app on a remote server.

So I’m using it to deploy WaterOnMars on my personal server and also to deploy the demo version on heroku. But more recently I added fabric’s configuration file (the “fabfile”) to the sources of the project as an officially maintained helper for development tasks1. It’s now usable to run the test suite, to launch the web app locally, to set-up the db and to deploy it on custom servers.

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  1. well I didn’t think of it in such a formal way obviously []

Giving OpenHatch a try

A few days ago I came across some news about OpenHatch and discovered this non-profit that aims at helping would-be open-source contributors to find projects to contribute too.

I must say that I find this idea really nice. Of course that’s yet another open-source project directory coming after sourceforge, github, ohloh etc but what I like here is that they also  try to formalize a way to define entry points for beginners (with specific tags on issues and a small pre-formatted FAQ).

So I decided to give it a try and see if I can attract would-be contributors to some of my projects, especially wateronmars, yapsy and shivasmiles. I expect that for all of these projects there is still a long way to go to make them perfectly welcoming to beginners, but the first step is done and we’ll see if we can do something out of that.

Another reason I like this “openhatch” idea is that in my actual job, when I interview people to hire, the ones that have contributed significantly to open source projects usually stand out. It’s far from being a strict selection criteria of course but usually a good sign anyway.