fabric: a good assistant for the development of WaterOnMars

wom-logo-128Despite spending currently more time using my WaterOnMars feed reader than developing it, I’m still making small improvements to it. And to make my life easier I could count on a solid little project: fabric !

fabric is a Python based command-line utility designed to help running commands remotely: typically to deploy a web app on a remote server.

So I’m using it to deploy WaterOnMars on my personal server and also to deploy the demo version on heroku. But more recently I added fabric’s configuration file (the “fabfile”) to the sources of the project as an officially maintained helper for development tasks1. It’s now usable to run the test suite, to launch the web app locally, to set-up the db and to deploy it on custom servers.

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  1. well I didn’t think of it in such a formal way obviously []

Review: The Mythical “Mythical Man Month”

This is a long overdue review of a long overdue read of the famous software project management book: The Mythical Man Month by Fed. P. Brooks, 1995 (1st ed. 1975).

I’ve heard about it several years ago, about how relevant it still was to current projects and more precisely how well it described what is systematically going wrong in software development. And all of that is true, impressively so !

Despite the vintage touch you can expect from a software-related book written at the dawn of software development (1975 !), the permanent disbelief of even the best educated developers toward the unavoidable occurrence of bugs and schedule slippage and managers’ natural tendency to look for manpower and neglect the productivity gains that could come from improving the information and tools available to a team, all of this is finely described and analyzed in this book.

Interestingly the author extended the book in 1995 to add more information and jeopardize his own previous assessments: answering some of his critics and reckoning some of his mistakes. This book embeds its own review !

This book is obviously a must read for anybody interested in project management and yet the first thing that struck me is how well the author characterizes the pleasure of programming, listing:

  • the joy of makingblack-24645_150
  • the joy of being useful
  • the fascination for puzzles and minutes mechanics
  • the joy of always learning
  • the joy of working on “pure thought” stuff

In the following, I will try to categorize a selection of the main other arguments that struck me, into three categories: Planning, Development and Organization.

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